Hashtags to Watch during Disasters

Starting 2010, where Twitter became one of the most visited and used social media sites. #Hashtags changed the way we perceive traffic in the web. In the end, making #hashtags, as tags attributed to your post can really make it through a traffic — making your post visible to people who happen to use the same hashtags.

Netizens, and other people in the government, on the other hand, managed to create sets of hashtags that will always be useful to seek for immediate help and information dissemenation during times of calamities and disasters.

According to the Official Gazaette (@govph)

We recognized that Twitter is a useful platform for disseminating government advisories, esp. to private media organizations, which can disseminate a message across media, social strata, and geographic location with speed and efficiency.
Twitter is also useful for collecting information from the ground, especially at times of disaster in places where a relatively large portion of the population is online (i.e., the capital).

The hashtags #rescuePH and #reliefPH were first used in August 2012, when the country was experiencing storm-enhanced monsoon rains. These were initiatives from the private sector. Enough people were using the hashtags to make them trend for days. Eventually, we adopted the hashtags in our tweets for disseminating government advisories, and for collecting reports from the ground. We also ventured into creating new hashtags, and into convincing media outlets to use unified hashtags.

Don’t use these hashtags on your selfies during the times of disasters.

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